SSH Screencast Series

Well a nice long but fun screencast series is all in the can.  You can find the first episode of eight over at typicalmacuser.com.  I spent a good bit of time doing the recording and thanks to Victor for the editing and post production.  By the time the series is over you will know pretty much everything I know about SSH.  At least all the juicy functional parts.  It is done for the target audience of Mac users so it is all about setting it up and tunneling all sorts of traffic through it to protect yourself when on public wifi hotspots or other risky public networks.

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7 Replies to “SSH Screencast Series”

  1. Informative podcast! Really looking forward to the rest of the series. Thank you!

  2. Informative podcast! Really looking forward to the rest of the series. Thank you!

  3. Hi, George. Say, thanks for the great series. I can't wait to hear how to tunnel VNC over ssh (in the next segment?). Thanks to your explanations, I've finally got mac-to-mac ssh access working, and with pub/priv key authentication. Next I'll try setting up mac-to-pc, since I admin quite a few PCs and need to do so securely.

    Thanks again!

    Tom Ludovise
    Geolink Communications
    Sebastopol CA

  4. This was great series, I adapted it to connect my work laptop PC to home iMac: and it works just fine!
    I use UltraVNC over ssh for remote desktop (the only problem I had was related to incompability of open ssh keys with PuTTY, however it has nothing to your podcasts) , WinSCP to have secure access to my files – many thanks for this inspiring introduction :)
    However using this setup for some time already I think that it would be nice to have an opportunity to work with VNC in the manner that would mimic real terminal server, i.e. with multiple users allowed to access their desktops at same time, plus one user next to real console.
    Is it possible, in your opinion?
    It seems like screen sharing (in Leopard) redirects local console (as expected from VNC), and on one hand breaks connection when I switch user, on the other hand disallow work for more then one person, either remote at computer console. Screen sharing is also not very efficient in terms of speed via WAN links (i.e. when I connect to my desktop via Internet, not LAN).
    Can you comment on this? I'm interested in expert opinion :)

  5. The keys are not really incompatible with putty. Just use puttygen to convert them from/to openssh format. VNC clients have a check box to allow multiple sessions. but each user has to remember to check that or kick off the existing session. Regular vnc level sharing is slow. That is why they let you decrease the color depth. The best performance experience on the mac I have seen is the for pay product Remote Desktop. It performs way better than the free built in only screen sharing. Likely some advanced compression and updating techniques in the client.

  6. This was great series, I adapted it to connect my work laptop PC to home iMac: and it works just fine!
    I use UltraVNC over ssh for remote desktop (the only problem I had was related to incompability of open ssh keys with PuTTY, however it has nothing to your podcasts) , WinSCP to have secure access to my files – many thanks for this inspiring introduction :)
    However using this setup for some time already I think that it would be nice to have an opportunity to work with VNC in the manner that would mimic real terminal server, i.e. with multiple users allowed to access their desktops at same time, plus one user next to real console.
    Is it possible, in your opinion?
    It seems like screen sharing (in Leopard) redirects local console (as expected from VNC), and on one hand breaks connection when I switch user, on the other hand disallow work for more then one person, either remote at computer console. Screen sharing is also not very efficient in terms of speed via WAN links (i.e. when I connect to my desktop via Internet, not LAN).
    Can you comment on this? I'm interested in expert opinion :)

  7. The keys are not really incompatible with putty. Just use puttygen to convert them from/to openssh format. VNC clients have a check box to allow multiple sessions. but each user has to remember to check that or kick off the existing session. Regular vnc level sharing is slow. That is why they let you decrease the color depth. The best performance experience on the mac I have seen is the for pay product Remote Desktop. It performs way better than the free built in only screen sharing. Likely some advanced compression and updating techniques in the client.

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