• Hello,

    I wanted to clarify that ShareTool doesn't take any steps to circumvent public key authentication. I believe the confusion may stem from the fact that the “Password” field in ShareTool works both for password login and passphrase-protected keys.

    ShareTool uses the private key from the user's ~/.ssh/ folder automatically. If prompted for a passphrase by SSH, it will provide the password entered by the user in ShareTool.

    If you're under Leopard, it's also possible that the operating system has stored the passphrase for your private key in the system keychain. Leopard manages SSH keys automatically and I believe the “Add to Keychain” option is checked by default in the new “Please provide the passphrase…” dialog.

    Thanks,
    Navdeep Bains
    ShareTool Support

  • Well I had removed my private key from my .ssh directory and it appeared to still let me in. I will try it again. And the password that let me in despite having required public key authentication is not the same password as the passphrase for my key.

  • Hello,

    Hrmm, that's strange. I'm not sure why that would be. You can confirm that ShareTool isn't doing any funny business by running the “ps” command while ShareTool is connected to a remote network:
    ps | grep ssh

    Thanks,
    Navdeep Bains
    ShareTool Support

  • That should have been:
    ps -xawww | grep ssh

  • Yup I had to dig out some ssh keychain entries from my mac osx keychain. Once I did that then it wanted my private key passphrase to work.

  • Yup I had to dig out some ssh keychain entries from my mac osx keychain. Once I did that then it wanted my private key passphrase to work.